Finding the Area of a Trapezoid Series

This is the summary of series on how to find the area of a trapezoid. A trapezoid is a quadrilateral ( a figure with four sides), whose two sides are parallel. This series is divided into three parts.

How to Find the Area of a Trapezoid Part 1 discusses the derivation of the formula. The derivation uses the two trapezoids to form a parallelogram and since the formula for finding the area of a parallelogram has been discussed, it can be used for computation.  In this post, an example was also shown on how to find the area of a trapezoid.

trapezoid

How to Find the Area of a Trapezoid Part 2 discusses two examples. The first one is how to find the area given the base and height. The second example is how to look for the height given the base and the area.

How to Find the Area of a Trapezoid Part 3 discusses how to find the base given the height and the area.

That’s it for this post, we will have exercises and quizzes in the next few days.

Good luck!

How to Find the Area of a Trapezoid Part 3

This the third part of a series on finding the area of a trapezoid here in PH Civil Service Review. In the first post, we discussed the derivation of the area of a trapezoid and give a worked example. In the second post, we discussed how to find the area given the base and the height as well as to find the height given the area and the base.

In this post, we are going to find the base, given the height and the area. We continue with the fourth example.

Example 4

A trapezoid has area 65 square centimeters, height 13 cm, and base of 4 cm. Find the other base.

Solution

In this example, we have A = 65, h = 13 and a = 4. We are looking for b» Read more

One Month Until The Exam! How’s Your Review?

I am not sure if you keep track of your calendar, but today is exactly one month before the next Civil Service Examination. As of this writing, the Official Civil Service Calendar still shows that the exam in on October 26, 2014 and there is no sign of change of schedule so far. This means that you have four weeks to prepare for the exam. Be sure to brush up with your grammar, vocabulary, and mathematics skills. This blog has a lot of reviewer, so all you need to do is read and answer the practice exercises and quizzes.

Aside from the articles about content, here are some tips that might help you more in your review.

In case you have not registered for the upcoming October 2014 exam, I still suggest that you continue your review and continue answering the exercises in this blog. This way, in the next exam which is usually held in April, you will be ready and more confident. I will be writing more exercises and tutorials in this blog, so you might want to subscribe. You can use the Subscribe by Mail box located at the upper right part of the page.

How to Find the Area of a Trapezoid Part 2

In the previous post, we have learned the formula for finding the area of a trapezoid. We derived that the formula for the area A of a trapezoid with base a and b (the base are the parallel sides), and height h is A = \frac{1}{2}h (a + b)

In this post, which is the second part of Finding the Area of a Trapezoid Series, we are going to continue with some examples. We will not only find the area of a trapezoid, but other missing dimensions such as base and height. Now, get your paper and pencils and try to solve the problems on your own before reading the solution.

We have already discussed one example in the previous post, so we start with the second example.  » Read more

How to Find the Area of a Trapezoid

We have learned how to calculate the areas of a square, rectangle, parallelogram, and circle. In this post, we are going to learn how to find the area of a trapezoid. This is the first post of Finding the Area of a Trapezoid Series.

A trapezoid is a polygon whose exactly one pair of sides are parallel*. The figure below is a trapezoid where sides a and b are parallel.

trapezoid

Notice that if we make another trapezoid which has the same size and shape as above, flip one trapezoid, and make one pair of the non-parallel sides meet, we can form the figure below. That figure is a parallelogram. Can you see why? » Read more

Grammar Tutorial: Simple Future Tense

The simple future tense indicates that the action is in the future relative to the speaker. Verbs in the future tense are not changed (or inflected), instead, helping verbs such as will and shall  are added before the base form of the verb.

Examples

I will buy a computer tomorrow.

I shall return.

Shall we dance?

Will you help me?

In the first example, the helping verb will is added before buy which is a verb in base form. In the second sentence, the helping verb shall is added before the verb return. The future tenses in question are also shown above.

» Read more

Grammar Tutorial: Simple Past Tense

Simple past tense is used when the action referred to happened in the past.

Example: They walked to the police station yesterday.

In this example, the verb walk is added with “ed” since the situation happened the day before. This is indicated by “yesterday.”

Rules in Forming the Verbs

a.) Verbs ending in e are usually just appended by -d.

Examples

  • dive – dived
  • tie – tied
  • carve – carved

» Read more

Grammar Tutorial: Simple Present Tense

We use the simple present tense when expressing action in the present taking place once, never or several times, facts, actions taking place one after another, and action set by a timetable or schedule

The simple present tense obeys the subject verb agreement and, of course, the verb is in present tense.

Simple present tense are used in the following situations.

(a) Facts and generalizations

1.) The sun rises from East.
2.) The dog barks.

(b) Repeated actions, customs,  and habits

1.) People celebrate Christmas on 25th December.
2.) Kenyans go for elections every five years.  » Read more

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