Browse Tag: ratio problems

Solving Ratio and Proportion Problems Part 2

In the previous post, we have learned the meaning and notation of ratio. We can write the ratio of 8 girls and 12 boys as 8:12 or as 8/12. However, if we represent this as fraction, we can also reduce the fraction to its lowest terms which is equal to 2/3. Converting to lowest term is dividing the numerator and denominator by the largest possible integer known as the greatest common factor or greatest common divisor. In the example above, the greatest common divisor of 8 and 12 is 4, and 8 divided by 4 is 2, and 12 divided by 4 is 3, so, 8:12 can also be represented as 2:3.

The Meaning of Direct Proportion

Consider the following problem.

A car is traveling at an average speed of 60 kilometers per hour. What is the total distance it traveled after 5 hours?

Solution

We can solve the problem above by simply multiplying 5 hours by 60 kilometers per hour giving us 300 kilometers. We can also answer the problem by simply constructing the table below.

proportion

Notice from the table that if the number of hours is multiplied by 2, then the distance is also multiplied by 2. For example, from 1 hour to 2 hours, the number of hours is multiplied by 2, and the distance is also multiplied by 2, that is 60 × 2 = 120 hours. From 2 hours to 4 hours, the number of hours is also multiplied by 2 and the distance is also multiplied by 2, that is 120 × 2 = 240 hours. If the number of hours is multiplied by 3, the distance is also multiplied by 3. From 1 hour to 3 hours, the number of hours is multiplied by 3 and the distance is also multiplied by 3, that is 60 × 3 = 180 hours.

Suppose we have two quantities and if we multiply one quantity by a number, then the other quantity is also multiplied the same number, then we say that the two quantities are directly proportional. In the example above, time and distance are the two quantities that are directly proportional.

Representing Direct Proportions

We can represent the problem above in ratio. The first ratio is 60 kilometers and 1 hour. The second ratio is 5 hours and an unknown number of kilometers. If we let the unknown number of hours be n, then the ratios are

1 hr :60 km and 5 hrs :n km

Notice that the number of hours is multiplied by 5 (1 hr to 5 hrs), so the distance should also be multiplied by 5. That is, 60 × 5 = 300.

Now that we found the answer to the problem above, let us represent them in ratios as shown.

1:60 and 5:300

Observe from the representation that the product of the outer terms (1 and 300) is equal to the product of the inner terms (60 and 5). The product are both 300. This property is always true in directly proportional quantities: the product of the outside terms (extremes) is equal to the product of the inside terms (means). In the original representation, we had

1:60 = 5:n

Using the relationship between the means and extremes, we can solve for n algebraically. That is,

1 × n = 60 × 5. So, n = 300.

This can also be represented in fraction as 1/60 = 5/n. Cross multiplying, we have n = (60)(5) = 300.

Summary

In a directly proportional relationship, if the ratios are a:b and c:d, then

a: b = c: d

and a × d = b × c.

Practice Problem

Three cubes of sugar is needed to make 1 cups of coffee. How many cubes of sugar is needed to make 20 cups of coffee?

Solution

Let x = number of cubes of sugar needed to make 20 cups of coffee.

3:1 = x:20

The product of the extremes is equal to the product of the means, so solving algebraically, we have

1(x) = (3)(20)
x = 60.

Therefore, we need 60 cubes of sugar for 20 cups of coffee.

In the next post, we are going to have some practice problems on how to solve direct proportion problems.

Solving Ratio and Proportion Problems Part 1

One of the key concepts tested in the Civil Service Exam is ratio and proportion. In this series, we are going to discuss how to solve problems involving ratio and proportion. We first begin below by explaining the meaning and concept of ratio and how to represent it.

Suppose we are cooking, and for every 4 teaspoons of vinegar, we put 3 teaspoons of soy sauce, then we can say the ratio of the volume of vinegar to the volume of soy sauce is “four is to three” and represent it as 4:3. We can also use the fraction 4/3 to represent the ratio above. Now, we discuss more examples about ratio.

Example 1

In a class, there are 24 girls and 18 boys. What is the ratio of (1) the number of girls to the number of boys and (2) the number of boys to the number of girls?

Answer

The number of girls is 24 and the number of boys is 18, so the ratio of the number of girls to the number of boys is 24:18 or 24/18. In contrast, the ratio of the number of boys to the number of girls is 18:24 or 18/24.

Example 2

In a box of colored balls, there are 5 red balls and 8 blue balls. What is the ratio of the number of blue balls to the total number of balls?

Answer

The number of blue balls is 8 and the total number of balls is 5 + 8 = 13. Therefore the ratio of the number of blue balls to the total number of balls is 8:13 or 8/13.

Example 3

Gemma put 2 teaspoons of sugar for every cup of coffee. Represent the ratio of the number of teaspoons of sugar if there are 6 cups of coffee.

Answer

For every cup of coffee, we need 2 teaspoons. Therefore, for 6 cups of coffee, we need 6 times 2 = 12 teaspoons. So, the ratio of the number of teaspoons and 6 cups of coffee is 12:6.

In the three examples above, we have learned how to represent ratio. The ratio A: B means how many times of B is A. For example, the ratio 4:3 means A is 4/3 times of B.

In the next post, we are going to discuss about proportion or equal ratio.

The Ratio Word Problems Tutorial Series

This is a series of tutorials regarding ratio word problems. Ratio is defined as the relationship between two numbers where the second number is how many times the first number is contained. In this series of problems, we will learn about the different types of ratio word problems.

How to Solve Word Problems Involving Ratio Part 1 details the intuitive meaning of ratio.  It uses arithmetic calculations in order to explain its meaning. After the explanation, the algebraic solution to the problem is also discussed.

How to Solve Word Problems Involving Ratio Part 2 is a continuation of the first part. In this part, the ratio of three quantities are described. Algebraic methods is used as a solution to solve the problem.

How to Solve Word Problems Involving Ratio Part 3 in this post, the ratio of two quantities are given. Then, both quantities are increased resulting to another ratio.

How to Solve Word Problems Involving Ratio Part 4 involves the difference of two numbers whose ratio is given.

If you have more math word problems involving ratio that are different from the ones mention above, feel free to comment below and let us see if we can solve them.